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The 10 Best Kettlebells

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Best Kettlebells

What are the best kettlebells on the market?

The lineage of the kettlebell and its various forms can be traced across dozens of different eras.

From the ancient Greeks to modern fitness pioneers like Pavel Tsatsouline, kettlebells have been rooted as a timeless mainstay of fitness culture.

Unlike barbells and dumbbells, kettlebells have always been looked at from more niche perspectives.

Old-time strongmen are often depicted executing strange movements – Turkish get-ups, side-bend presses, suitcase deadlifts, bent overhead presses, and more.

In recent decades, a greater appreciation for kettlebells’ effectiveness in developing power, explosiveness, and dynamic flexibility has pushed them from obscurity to center-stage in gyms everywhere. 

Looking to complete your fitness arsenal or add to your home gym collection?

Well, we’ve pulled together a specialty list of the 10 best kettlebell options available in terms of price and quality.

Let’s dive in! 

 

The Best Kettlebells Compared

Our equipment lists are created by researching the best-reviewed products from the most reputable companies and web sources. 

Here’s our list of the 10 best kettlebells on the market:

 

In A Rush? Here’s Our Top Pick:

Best Kettlebell Overall
Yes4All Vinyl Coated Kettlebell
$17.31
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10/15/2021 11:19 am GMT

Kettlebells are all about functionality and dynamic, natural movement.

In that spirit, if you’re looking for a quick and clear winner without digging through the details, we’ve got you locked in.

The Yes4All brand Vinyl Coated Kettle Bells provide a well-balanced cast iron construction complete with a textured handle and vinyl-lined base.

The subtle grooving along the handle ensures plenty of friction for grip, while the rubbery coating minimizes impact damage to your surroundings and the bell itself.

These things are designed for roughhousing and are built to last even in the face of harsh environmental conditions – rain or shine, dungeon, or boutique gym. 

Yes4All provides various weight options from 10lbs to 50lbs, meaning they’re up for grabs to trainees of all strength and experience levels. 

 

 

10. Everyday Essentials – Cast Iron Kettlebell

Best Budget Kettlebell
Everyday Essentials Cast Iron Kettlebell
$12.50
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Starting off our list is the cast iron kettlebell from Everyday Essentials. There aren’t many frills to discuss – and that’s to your benefit.

These kettlebells provide a quality baseline for design, affordability, and durability.

Between the cast iron construction, textured grip, and balanced weight distribution of the bell, you’ll be equipped with all you need for a safe and effective training session.

Everyday Essentials’ kettlebells are finished with a paint laminate meant to improve durability and smooth the weight’s otherwise roughcast iron texture. 

Pros

  • Wear and tear-resistant laminate coating improves kettlebell durability and longevity
  • Textured grip and cast iron construction for well-balanced, high-friction grip at the handle

Cons

  • On occasion, reviews have mentioned issues with the matte coating chipping and becoming abrasive or uncomfortable to touch

 

9. Yes4All – Adjustable Kettlebell

Best Adjustable Kettlebell
Yes4All Adjustable Kettlebell
$19.95
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Kettlebells serve a particularly useful role for individuals with space limitations.

They’re much more compact than plates and barbells and are smaller than most dumbbells (while arguably providing a wider variety of movements).

Most people are not going to be fitting a power rack and full dumbbell set in their apartment or backyard. 

Yes4All’s adjustable kettlebell was designed with space restrictions in mind.

Adjustable kettlebells are an all-in-one style solution that can be stored nearly anywhere – think closets, car trunks or backseats, your laundry room, or your apartment balcony. 

A unique multi-purpose design means the handle can be converted into a dumbbell, or a push-up station. As a kettlebell, it can be loaded with weight plates or attached to other dumbbells.

A threaded rod allows for length adjustments to change the weight’s center of gravity. 

Pros

  • A versatile, discrete design makes it easy to store your kettlebell and its weight plates almost anywhere
  • The adjustable rod can be loaded with up to 100lbs of additional weight
  • It can be adapted to hold weight plates and dumbbells or be used as a push-up/dip station

Cons

  • Weight distribution and center of gravity of the adjustable kettlebell can provide a non-standard experience – momentum will be carried slightly differently, which can impact high speed or high rep workouts, especially at heavier weights

 

8. CAP Barbell – Cast Iron Kettlebell

Most Durable Kettlebell
CAP Barbell Cast Iron Kettlebell
$89.88
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Kettlebell training incorporates a wide range of power-dependent movements.

Their popularity among cross-training circles is owed to the unique balance of aerobic endurance development, and functional strength patterns they facilitate. 

The phrase “form over weight” regularly applies to kettlebell-based training. However, sometimes we’d like a bit more heft to our session.

The heavier a kettlebell gets, the more momentum it will generate during swings, and the more acceleration will be required for successful cleans, snatches, and jerks.

These heightened physical demands are great for cultivating core stability, movement timing, and explosiveness. 

Where many competitors cap out around 50lbs, CAP Barbell provides a deeper range of weight options.

With CAP’s kettlebells, you can stick with the common 10lbs-50lbs range, or continue pushing from 60lbs to 80lbs.

Coincidentally, the heavier a kettlebell gets, the more viable it becomes for additional movements ordinarily reserved for dumbbells (presses, rows, deadlifts, etc). 

Pros

  • Broader weight range than most competitors (10lbs, 15lbs, 20lbs, 25lbs, 30lbs, 35lbs, 40lbs, 45lbs, 50lbs, 60lbs, 70lbs, 80lbs)
  • Enamel paint covering and uniform cast iron make for trustworthy balance and weight distribution

Cons

  • Small number of reviews have noted concerns regarding the handle – either too thin, or brittle (e.g., snapping off from the body of the kettlebell)
  • Chipping of the paint laminate can sometimes cause an abrasive surface at the handle

 

7. Best Choice Products – Kettlebell Set

Best Kettlebell Set For Beginners
Best Choice Products Kettlebell Set
$47.99
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Best Choice Products’ kettlebell set is the go-to for newer trainees.

The set provides 3 kettlebells of varying sizes, weighing in at 5lbs, 10lbs, and 15lbs.

These weights are ideal for beginning lifters, or those who prefer using kettlebells in a rehabilitative or pre-habilitative capacity.

A kettlebell’s center of gravity makes it perfect for accessing and grooving difficult movement patterns.

At lighter weights, intentionally engaging with compromising positions (for example, around the shoulder joints) can help strengthen connective tissue and nurture blood flow to the area. 

These kettlebells come with a 3-slot staging platform for easy storage.

They’re constructed of pure concrete and encased in a tough HDPE plastic covering to guarantee longevity and minimal wear and tear.

Pros

  • Comes equipped with its own staging platform/docking station for easy storage and placement
  • Great for light blood-flow work or rehabilitative training

Cons

  • Very low weight range (5lbs, 10lbs, 15lbs) – fitting for beginners, but intermediate lifters and beyond may want to look elsewhere
  • Concrete construction tends to be more brittle, and crack-prone should a kettlebell be dropped or thrown accidentally

 

6. Kettle Gryp – Adjustable Kettlebell

Most Portable Kettlebell
Kettle Gryp Adjustable Kettlebell
$34.95
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Kettle Gryp’s adjustable kettlebell presents an intuitive and simple answer to the demand for versatile, portable training equipment.

The 1-lb, ABS plastic constructed clamp fits snugly around most dumbbells and bears weight up to 55lbs. 

The handle’s design means you can pack it away in a backpack, glove compartment, or handbag.

With Kettle Gryp’s adjustable clamp, you’ll have access to an effective kettlebell workout wherever there are dumbbells to latch onto – perfect in a pinch, or on the road hopping from one motel gym after another.

A bonus? Kettle Gryp offers a lifetime warranty and any-reason return policy.

Pros

  • A veteran-owned company – manufacturing from San Diego, CA
  • Extremely portable – you can store it in nearly any size of travel bag, vehicle compartment, or mobile storage
  • Compatible with most dumbbells up to 55lbs – as long as there’s a selection of dumbbells around, you’re good to go.

Cons

  • The Kettle Gryp was built with travel and transport as a priority. Its max load of 55lbs is under comparable adjustable dumbbell options.
  • The handle does not come paired with a weight set, and is compatible only with dumbbells – not plates. 

 

5. Bionic Body – Soft Kettlebell

Best Soft Kettlebell
Bionic Body Soft Kettlebell
$55.99
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Bionic Body’s Soft Kettlebell stands out on our list for its non-solid design.

Whereas most kettlebells are made from cast iron or concrete, this soft kettlebell is fashioned from a vinyl casing packed with sand.

The fabric exterior and softer, granular interior mitigate most risks related to accidentally damaging your surroundings (or the kettlebell itself) through impact or hard use. 

This particular model comes in weights ranging from 10lbs to 40lbs, with 5lb increments between.

It runs a bit larger than standard kettlebells, shifting the center of gravity in a way that will carry a lot of momentum even at lighter weights.

Bionic Body’s 2-year warranty all but guarantees satisfaction after heavy use. 

Pros

  • Soft exterior and interior components drastically minimize potential damage to the kettlebell and environment in the case of accidents
  • Two-year use warranty offered by the manufacturer
  • Uniform weight distribution, but the larger size means a unique experience of momentum – as though you were using a heavier cast iron kettlebell

Cons

  • Weight range is marginally smaller than other, comparable kettlebell options
  • Vinyl jacket and sand interior means there are some risks of tears and leakage

 

4. Rep Fitness – Kettlebell

Best Competition Kettlebell Alternative
Rep Fitness Kettlebell
$109.99
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Kettlebells might serve most of their purpose in lower weight ranges, but heavy-hitting options do exist. Rep Fitness’s Kettlebell set runs from 2.2lbs, all the way to 106lbs. 

Tossing around over 100lbs is a game of balance, control, and strength not regularly encountered with lightweight kettlebells. 

Gravity cast construction and a signature matte coating protect these monstrous kettlebells both from you and themselves. 

The incredible weight range Rep Fitness offers makes their kettlebells perfect for novice and elite athletes alike.

The upper weight ranges enable effective strength-focused training even among intermediate and expert lifters. 

Pros

  • Largest weight range on the list (2.2lbs, 9lbs, 13lbs, 17lbs, 22lbs, 26lbs, 35lbs, 39lbs, 44lbs, 48lbs, 53lbs, 62lbs, 70lbs, 80lbs, 88lbs, 97lbs, 106lbs)
  • Heaviest kettlebell available on our list at 106lbs – excellent for individuals looking to incorporate more strength-based movements into their kettlebell regimen
  • Gravity cast and finished with a matte texture for superior durability and grip

Cons

  • Some reviews have characterized the matte finish as brittle, or particularly susceptible to impact damage. Heavier weight kettlebells will likely be at greater risk of comparable damage.

 

3. Yes4All – Cast Iron Kettlebell

Best Value Kettlebell
Yes4All Cast Iron Kettlebell
$12.79
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Yes4All’s cast iron option is offered in 5lb increments from 5lb to 50lbs. If simplicity and reliability are your first and second loves, these might be the kettlebells for you.

Finished with matte black paint, these kettlebells display a clean, solid aesthetic – and their design follows.

The handle and weight are uniformly textured, ensuring no seams or uneven surfaces. The base is cleanly flattened for a high degree of stability. 

With near-universally positive reviews, Yes4All’s cast iron kettlebell represents one of the highest value items on our list.

Pros

  • Decent weight variability from 5lb to 50lbs
  • Uniform coating to reduce incidence of seams or unleveled contact surfaces

Cons

  • Though sparse, a number of reviews have noted issues with the handle’s durability (e.g., chipping, cracking) after frequent use

 

2. Bowflex – SelectTech Kettlebell

Best All-In-One Kettlebell
Bowflex SelectTech Kettlebell
$149.00
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Bowflex is a household name among home gym enthusiasts. They’re known for their unique re-designs of training equipment.

The SelectTech Kettlebell keeps to that innovative mold. It works similarly to other adjustable kettlebells on this list, but with a number of BowFlex brand twists.

First, the entire system is operated through a cube-like apparatus fitted with a weight dial.

The dial can be adjusted to the desired weight – between 8 and 40lbs – and a mechanism will load or unload a series of weight plates contained inside the dial container. Any plates not in use will rest on a docking station. 

In true BowFlex fashion, their kettlebell system comes with access to 2 dozen trainer-instructed movements. 

Pros

  • All-in-one, self-contained design – weight plates are built into the kettlebell apparatus, and provide the docking station when different weight settings are chosen
  • Compact and aesthetically designed – can be stored nearly anywhere
  • Comes with instructional content for correct execution of 24 kettlebell-focused movements

Cons

  • Adjustable kettlebells provide a slightly different center of gravity and flow than standard kettlebells
  • Weight range is a bit limited compared to other options (8lbs, 12lbs, 20lbs, 25lbs, 35lbs, 40lbs)

 

1. Yes4All – Vinyl Coated Kettle Bell

Best Kettlebell Overall
Yes4All Vinyl Coated Kettlebell
$17.31
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10/15/2021 11:19 am GMT

Control, safety, performance, durability – things you want to consider in your kettlebell selection.

Yes4All’s Vinyl Coated Kettle Bell checks every box required to constitute a powerful and reliable training tool. 

Standard cast iron construction with a vinyl lining ensures uniform loading of weight throughout the kettlebell, and protection against impact damage incurred by accidental drops or dings.

The vinyl coat provides multiple vectors of value: reduced floor damage, resistance to environmental conditions, sustained kettlebell body integrity, and decreased corrosion exposure. 

A textured handle will keep your hands locked in, and the leveled bottom provides a great surface for performing push-ups, dips, V-sits, or handstands.

Pros

  • Vinyl coating for protection against corrosion, impact damage, environmental conditions, and heavy use
  • 5lb to 50lb weight range, separated by 5lb increments – a respectable range appealing to lifters of all experience levels
  • Uniform cast iron construction guarantees a consistent center of gravity important for safely performing high power movements

Cons

  • Reviews have noted that the vinyl covering can sometimes shift or deform due to impact, sometimes altering the kettlebell’s alignment / flat bottom

 

FAQs About Kettlebells

Here are our answers to some of the most frequently asked questions about kettlebells:

 

Q: Why is the kettlebell so effective?

Standard lifting equipment is usually designed so that the weight’s center of gravity can be oriented in a direct line relative to our bodies.

Movements with barbells and dumbbells are executed linearly along vertical and horizontal planes. 

Kettlebells are designed in such a way that the center of mass is positioned further away from the body.

When performing explosive movements, the core of a kettlebell will swing toward or away from the body (whereas a dumbbell would remain in a static position).

They demand the body to be responsive, agile, and total body engagement in order to properly “catch” the momentum and flow with the weight’s movement. 

Here’s a rough example: compare a football tackle to a barbell squat.

In both movements, an athlete will try to exert as much force into the ground as possible in order to generate the power necessary to execute a successful movement.

Lowering a squat requires static core engagement and a controlled descent – like a rubber band building tension before shooting back up.

Comparatively, a tackle will require dynamic bracing and reactive movement – force will need to be absorbed and exchanged rapidly in nearly equal measures.

This is similar to a kettlebell’s functional movement pattern.

 

Q: What do kettlebells do for your body?

Kettlebells target overall power development, speed-strength, fast-twitch muscle fiber activation, and aerobic capacity.

They’re regularly included in full-body training circuits for their versatile applications. 

Lighter kettlebell variants can be used in high rep, high volume, rapid-turnover circuit training to cultivate immensely challenging cardio sessions.

Alternatively, a heavier kettlebell can be used in lower rep ranges to work on stronger hip extension (important for weightlifting movements like the snatch, or clean & jerk).

These movements can be joined with other training tools – like resistance bands – to amplify the stabilizing and reactive demands of a kettlebell.

The weight distribution of kettlebells allows them to access certain loading patterns in our tissues and joints that are incredibly potent for physical rehabilitation and mobility practice.

For instance, a standard dumbbell might place too much strain directly over a damaged rotator cuff.

A lightweight kettlebell could be leveraged to open up the area via gentle swings or rotations, flushing blood into the immobile/inflamed region. 

There are hundreds of years of applications for kettlebells, both niche, and commonplace.

These are training tools, and their potential uses extend as far as your imagination can take them.

 

Q: What kind of body do kettlebells give you?

Everyone wants to know the best way to attain their goal physique.

Whether that’s the timeless Brad-Pitt-from-Fight-Club kind of lean, Jen Selter, or 8-time Mr. Olympia – Ronnie Coleman – the answer is the same: your diet and genetics will play the most significant roles in your body aesthetics and composition. 

That’s not to say kettlebells don’t stimulate your muscles in a different way than more standard resistance training equipment.

If you’d like a good idea of the kinds of physiques built on high-frequency kettlebell use, look no further than CrossFit gyms.

While CrossFit training is not limited to kettlebell use, the multidisciplinary approach to training incorporates countless power-oriented movements and training implements (kettlebells included). 

Some common markers of crosstraining / kettlebell-centric athletes:

  • Round, “capped” shoulders owing to deltoid use in stabilizing kettlebells – including static holds and dynamic movements
  • Powerful hips and glutes built through high volume hip extensions
  • Rigid core developed by counterbalancing the shifting center of gravity in the kettlebell

 

Q: Are kettlebells good for beginners?

Kettlebells are an excellent starting point for fitness beginners. They come in many different sizes, weights, and materials, meaning new lifters can find the perfect match for their needs. 

Perhaps the best kettlebell weight application for beginners is training proper movement patterns.

The ability to fully extend the hips through a safe range of motion while keeping the core and posterior chain engaged is a crucial aspect of athletic coordination.

Unfortunately, this level of proficiency often lacks in untrained individuals.

Using the momentum of a kettlebell to pull the body into reactive positions can give trainees a better sense of their bodies.

Knowing how you move in dynamic situations is invaluable for making form micro-adjustments, bracing your core properly, and navigating your cues at heavier weights. 

 

Q: Which kettlebells should I start with?

We’ve listed a number of the best kettlebell brands here for those looking to get started.

For beginners, a lighter range of weights is recommended to learn safe and consistent habits while lifting.

If you already have a solid strength foundation, you might consider going with a mid-range weight (30lbs – 60lbs).

The heaviest options are a bit more niche and should generally be reserved for kettlebell specialists – there’s little reason for most other lifters to worry about heaving a 100+lb kettlebell.

However, nothing is stopping you from going down that road. A heavier kettlebell might suit your programming perfectly. 

Supposing you’re getting involved in cross-training leagues or CrossFit events, you might want to train how you play.

It could benefit you to seek out options that closely imitate a competition kettlebell, or are used as competition kettlebells themselves. 

 

Q: How heavy should my kettlebell be?

The heaviness of a kettlebell depends entirely on your training purposes. 

Very light kettlebells are great for teaching new movements, performing rehabilitative or pre-habilitative exercises, or building strength and coordination in untrained individuals. 

Mid-range kettlebells provide the bread and butter of kettlebell training – high volume, high-intensity aerobic training.

Weights in the 20lb – 60lb range are easily adapted to a wide variety of strength or power-based movements.

Whether you’re hitting max rep hip swings for time, or performing a variation of lateral side raises, middleweight kettlebells will provide you with everything you need.

 

Q: Are kettlebells good for losing belly fat?

The best kettlebell brands in the world are not going to give you abs on their own. You can’t target belly fat on its own.

Further, without the right diet and an appropriate caloric deficit, you won’t get very far. That said, kettlebells are highly effective for fat loss as aerobic tools when used intelligently.

Cardio in the form of walking, jogging, or running can be grueling, time-consuming, and boring.

Kettlebells offer an alternative to traditional cardio practices. What is cardio, anyway? Getting your heart rate up, keeping it there, and controlling your breath.

If you have any questions about a kettlebell’s effectiveness in aerobic training, get your hands on one and perform fifty or more consecutive hip swings.

Your heart rate and breathing will tell you all you need to know.

 

Q: Is it ok to use kettlebells every day?

There’s no reason you can’t implement some form of kettlebell-based training every day. 

Basic training principles don’t change. You’ll need to ensure you are recovering properly between workouts.

The way kettlebells hammer our stabilizing muscles and fast-twitch fibers mean caution should be exercised in balancing barbell/dumbbell compound movements with kettlebell sessions.

If your rotator cuffs or hips just took a beating the other day from a high volume power session, pay close attention to your body when loading it with straight weight (e.g., a barbell bench press or squat) or during foam rolling.

Depending on how new you are to kettlebells, it might take some time for you to become acquainted with all the small ways regular kettlebell training impacts you.

Take your time, build new movements with patience, and find the best parity between each of your training tools.

 

Q: Why are kettlebells bad for you?

There’s a semi-popular phrase in sports science: “There is no bad movement, just unprepared movement.”

The same holds true for training equipment.

If a lifter or athlete is not adequately prepared or conditioned for a specific movement, they are at risk of injuring themselves or exacerbating existing issues. 

Using kettlebells properly requires slightly more nuance than straight weight. Manipulating the center of gravity can be tricky, and movement timings require quick reaction speeds.

Without the right mobility and coordination, a kettlebell can literally toss you around – potentially compromising your joints and muscles. 

 

Q: Can you build muscle with only kettlebells?

After all is said and done, kettlebells are simply hunks of metal (or sand, concrete, etc). Its weight – pure and simple.

Where there is resistance, there is the potential to cultivate muscle mass and strength. 

The construction and balance of kettlebells make them ideal for swinging and hinge-based movements, but there’s no reason a lifter cannot use them to emulate an isolation or compound dumbbell movement.

Curling, pressing, squatting, deadlifting, rowing – a kettlebell can be used for any of these classic exercises. 

Power movements are not always the best way to develop muscle size, but they will increase neural recruitment and contractile potential of the muscle tissue.

Fiber recruitment is where athletes begin to take on a denser composition (Olympic weightlifting physiques illustrate this principle well). 

 

Q: Are kettlebells worth it?

A piece of training equipment is worth exactly what the trainee is willing to put into it.

Technically speaking, you can build a comprehensive, effective training plan using your couch and bedside table. We aren’t going to do that, though.

Kettlebells open the door to an entire world of training methodology once implemented by the greatest strongmen of countless eras.

These weights have been tested through the ages and still hold reverence among functional strength advocates for their training versatility. 

For those with limited windows to train or individuals that travel consistently, there are probably few better options than a quality kettlebell.

They offer the widest range of exercise options while taking up the least possible amount of storage space.

 

Q: How To Choose / Which To Choose? 

What’s the best kettlebell for you?

Are you a competitor? Look into the options we’ve listed and find which ones closely reflect competition kettlebell design.

Of course, competition kettlebells aren’t going to differ much from the standard fare – but it can’t hurt to get something as close to the real deal as possible.

Newer to kettlebell training or lifting in general? Go for a lighter weight range. Consider an adjustable kettlebell to avoid the need to buy additional weights as you begin to improve. 

Think of yourself as a kettlebell expert? You’ll want to start attacking the heavier options and pushing some limits.

Make sure your selections are built soundly – preferably from cast iron or steel. You certainly don’t want a handle snapping off during a 100lb kettlebell swing.

 

Summary

Kettlebells have seen a resurgence in the past few decades.

They’ve been a mainstay of old-time strongmen, a focus of Russian special forces training, and have carved out a class of their own in the modern fitness landscape. 

Using kettlebells effectively requires more training knowledge than barbells and dumbbells – but the yield speaks for itself. Power.

Modern athletic programming prioritizes kettlebell training for its unique impact on power development, speed, and bodily proprioception (awareness of how your body is moving). 

Getting started is half the battle. Grab a bell, master the technique, and get swinging.

Best Kettlebell Overall
Yes4All Vinyl Coated Kettlebell
$17.31
Check Price on Amazon
We earn a commission if you click this link and make a purchase at no additional cost to you.
10/15/2021 11:19 am GMT

Here’s a quick recap of the 10 best kettlebells:

  1. Yes4All – Vinyl Coated Kettlebell (Best Kettlebell Overall)
  2. Bowflex – SelectTech Kettlebell (Best All-In-One Kettlebell)
  3. Yes4All – Cast Iron Kettlebell (Best Value Kettlebell)
  4. Rep Fitness – Kettlebell (Best Competition Kettlebell Alternative)
  5. Bionic Body – Soft Kettlebell (Best Soft Kettlebell)
  6. Kettle Gryp – Adjustable Kettlebell (Most Portable Kettlebell)
  7. Best Choice Products – Kettlebell Set (Best Kettlebell For Beginners)
  8. CAP Barbell – Cast Iron Kettlebell (Most Durable Kettlebell)
  9. Yes4All – Adjustable Kettlebell (Best Adjustable Kettlebell)
  10. Everyday Essentials – Cast Iron Kettlebell (Best Budget Kettlebell)

What’s your favorite kettlebell? Leave a comment below. 

With almost two decades of lifting experience under his belt, Matt shares his knowledge and expertise with us around bodybuilding and supplementation. Deadlifts and barbell curls are his go-to exercises, and, when he's not writing about health and fitness, you'll find him in the gym busting out some arms! Follow Jacked Gorilla on Instagram: @jackedgorillanews

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